Color Meditation

Cinnabar

December 13, 2013 12:00 am - December 13, 2013 3:00 am

<p style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 150px; text-align: left; font-size: 14px; font-family: ‘Century Gothic’;" align="left"><strong style="text-align: center; letter-spacing: 0px;">Featuring the artwork of</strong></p>
<p style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 150px; text-align: left; font-size: 14px; font-family: ‘Century Gothic’;" align="left"><strong style="text-align: center; letter-spacing: 0px;">Joseph Cohen &amp; Lawrence Fodor&nbsp;</strong></p>
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<p style="margin: 0px; font-size: 10px; font-family: ‘Century Gothic’; text-align: left;" align="left"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px;"><strong>Joseph Cohen</strong>, TX-13 Biennial artist and MFA graduate from UTSA will be showing a collection of his propositions at Cinnabar. The delicate precision of combining precious metals and gemstone dust with pigment and paint delivers a unique and pristine meditation on color.&nbsp;</span></p>
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<p style="margin: 0px; font-size: 10px; font-family: ‘Century Gothic’; text-align: left;" align="left"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px;">Cohen layers his custom paint on a variety of mediums including birch, canvas, vinyl, cigar boxes, and carbon fiber. Each work is methodical and as he coats the surface over one hundred times he achieves textures and movement in the work that make it hard for the viewer to restrain from touching the surface.&nbsp;</span></p>
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<p style="margin: 0px; font-size: 10px; font-family: ‘Century Gothic’; text-align: left;" align="left"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px;">"The "Propositions" that I offer are philosophical inquiries into both the nature of painting and human perception." His work engages the viewer to draw on all faculties from sensuality to geometry. Once the viewer engages the artwork by in different lights and positions he/she can meditate on the proposition or the purpose of the work. Questions of methods, colors, textures and materials begin to seep out of the paint. Joseph Cohen has a strong base of collectors including work in the permanent collection the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, TX.&nbsp;</span></p>
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<p style="margin: 0px; font-size: 10px; font-family: ‘Century Gothic’; text-align: left;" align="left"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px;">Lawrence Fodor joins the San Antonio art scene from Santa Fe, NM. Three different mediums&nbsp; will be exhibited and each represents a different meditation on color. Cinnabar begins with exhibiting what Fodor is best known for: his opulent and densely layered paintings exemplifying the sublime force of the earth and sea.&nbsp;</span></p>
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<p style="margin: 0px; font-size: 10px; font-family: ‘Century Gothic’; text-align: left;" align="left"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px;">His second meditation is a departure from his paintings in every aspect. "Holding Light" changes the Scale, medium , process, and impact of his work. It is a series of watercolors mounted on 7" maple squares. Each square has over 1,600-2,600 strokes as evidenced by a stroke on the back of the square. Each square is then added to a grid creating hundreds of points of light through the negative space. As Fodor describes, "There is a paradox within this all. While I am attempting to give ‘definition’ it is ultimately impossible. Never the less I am compelled to try – to define – to count (like all humans struggle to give definition to their lives) and in doing so I am ultimately ‘pointing out’ the indefinable nature of it all."&nbsp;</span></p>
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<p style="margin: 0px; font-size: 10px; font-family: ‘Century Gothic’; text-align: left;" align="left"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px;">K?an boxes are the third medium in the exhibition at Cinnabar. Cigar boxes (collected by Fodor from his youth) contain secret embedded treasures that act as time capsules. Once filled the boxes act as drop cloths for the larger paintings. After a few years, the Koan boxes make their ways to the walls. The sides are gilded creating a paradox that both anchors and separates the box from the wall. The Japanese K?an origin of the word is literally "matter for public thought." &nbsp;</span></p>
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<p style="margin: 0px; font-size: 10px; font-family: ‘Century Gothic’; text-align: left;" align="left"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px;">The boxes, paintings, and watercolors are just that: a matter to ruminate on- <strong>A color meditation.&nbsp;</strong></span></p>
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