Skin in the Game Act 2

FL!GHT Gallery

January 29, 2018 6:00 pm - January 29, 2018 8:00 pm

The phrase “skin in the game” refers to an action of investment (not just financial) where capital is put forth into an endeavor with hopes of success. The greater the investment, the more ownership the investor has, but conversely, the more that investor has to lose (exposure). He/she is said to have “skin in the game”. This art project is a play on this phrase, tackling a general question about how much people are actually willing to support art by way of consumption. Conversely, that phrase carries a more literal interpretation, as the project uses tattooing and the skin as a point of origin for this discussion.

Objective:
To instigate dialogue about the consumption and collection of art through a format that popular culture is very active in but art institutions are skeptical of.


Process:
This exhibition incorporates data visualizations, drawing, painting, dialogue, and live performance. Considering that the primary question of this project is “why are average income people seemingly more willing to consume tattoos vs. fine art?”, it forces the language of tattoo into the framework of fine art, and vice versa, to instigate both a public and private dialogue about why one form seems more“agreeable” than the other. The performance component of the exhibition tangibly confronts viewers with questions of patronage, collection, consumption, and ownership regarding art.


The exhibition will open with a live performance. During the run of the exhibition the gallery will operate as an open studio, a point from which to collect more research data through surveys and conversation, to reflect about one’s reasons for collecting and consuming art in the way that they do. The concluding week of the exhibition will be an extended performance. Overall, the exhibition aims to tackle art consumption behavior and perceptions of elitism (rightly or wrongly) attached to art galleries and institutions. At its core, this project coalesces on dialogue of art through questions about expectations of art, accessibility, and expression.